Connect with us

History

America Once Accidentally Dropped a Nuke On Little Girls’ Playhouse

Fortunately and remarkably, no one got seriously hurt.

A A A

Sixty-one years ago, a nuclear bomb was accidentally dropped in South Carolina. It happened on March 11, 1958 and not a lot of people know that something like this happened. The Boeing Stratojet belonging to the U.S. Air Force took off from the base and flew to the United Kingdom and then to Africa, carrying nuclear weapons just in case a war with the Soviet Union would ensue.

By accident, the captain pulled the emergency release pin that resulted to the bomb, a Mark 6, falling off the plane.

Thr US Air Force accidentally dropped a nuclear bomb in South Carolina.

Two sisters Frances and Helen Gregg, who were nine and six years old, respectively, at that time were playing with their cousin 9-year-old Ella Davies in the playhouse that their father Walter Gregg had built for them. This playhouse stood behind their house in Mars Bluff, South Carolina. Just minutes after the children moved away from the playhouse, the bomb hit the ground, detonating conventional explosives that destroyed the playhouse.

The bomb hit and destroyed a playground in Mars Bluff.

The girls and the rest of the Gregg family were injured but they survived the explosion. However, the blast from the bomb, which lacked a nuclear core, completely destroyed patriarch Walter Gregg’s vegetable garden.

The blast also completely destroyed Walter Gregg’s vegetable garden.

The Greggs’ house was destroyed, and so were other buildings nearby but thankfully no one got seriously hurt. The family sued the Air Force and was compensated with $54,000, which is equivalent to over $448,000 in present day.

The bomb dropped was a Mark 6, similar with this one.

The site of impact created a crater that measured a width of 70 feet and a depth of 35 feet.

The bomb site is located in a wooded area.

The girls and the rest of the Gregg family were injured but they survived the explosion.

This was how much the nuclear bomb weighed.

Not a lot of people know what went down in Mars Bluff in 1958.

The aircraft crew members were all detained once they landed. The US Air Force initially thought that it was an act of sabotage but once they explained their side, they avoided reprimand. The bombing crew also apologized to the Gregg family.

The Greggs were lucky enough to have dodged that terrible fate and that was because the bomb dropped didn’t have the catastrophic nuclear rod. Still, the absence of the destructive component did not stop the Mark 6 from leaving a “mark” in history.

History

This Pair of Ancient Skeletons Has Been Locked in Embrace for 6,000 Years

The Lovers of Valdaro wowed the world when they were discovered in 2007.

In 2007, at a Neolithic tomb in San Giorgio near Mantua, Italy, archaeologists made a fascinating discovery - the Lovers of Valdaro. Also called the Valdaro Lovers, the pair of skeletons is believed to date back approximately 6,000 years. The two skeletons, locked in eternal embrace, appear to have been buried facing each other.

Archaeologist Elena Maria Menotti led the excavation of the skeletons. According to her team's findings, the pair are male and female, not older than 20 years old, and about 5'2" (157 cm) in height. Menotti decided that the couple should not be separated and that their unique position should be preserved. And so during the excavation, the team dug up the block of earth in which the skeletons were found and placed them in a box.

The Lovers of Valdaro were discovered in San Giorgio near Mantua, Italy, in 2007.

Continue Reading

History

This Newly Discovered 14,000-Year-Old Settlement Can Change North American History

It is three times older than the Pyramids of Giza.

A 14,000-year-old settlement has been recently discovered along the coastline in Canada. This scientific discovery corroborates with ancient stories that have originated from the indigenous Heiltsuk Nation people, saying that their ancestors hailed from a mysterious settlement somewhere along Canada's coastline during the last Ice Age.

The settlement was found last year, lying somewhere along the British Columbia's Central Coast on Triquet Island. Archaeologists from the University of Victoria, Hakai Institute, and local First Nations found remnants of charcoal and ancient tools such as fish hooks, spears, and a hand drill used to light fires.

Analysis of the charcoal found on the site revealed that the settlement is around 13,613 to 14,086 years old, making this community one of the oldest human settlements ever found in North America. The site is twice as old as the wheel and is three times older than the Pyramids of Giza.

Continue Reading

History

It Was Once Someone’s Job to Talk to the King While He Sat on the Toilet

Being the Groom of the Stool was a highly coveted position in the royal house.

Even a king has a daily duty to attend to, but of course, he can't be expected to do it on his own. From the 1500s to the 1700s, British kings chose lucky nobles to be their Groom of the Stool, a once highly coveted position in the royal house. The task? To chat with the king while he did his business on his luxurious, velvet-cushioned toilet called the 'close stool.'

The job might not seem glamorous, but many desired the position for good reason. Every day, as the king sat on his other throne, he unloaded in more ways than one. He revealed secrets, shared his innermost thoughts, asked for counsel, and even listened to the woes of his personal groom and offered to help.

The King of England’s toilet was a velvet-cushioned portable seat, below which was a pewter chamber pot enclosed in a wooden box.

Continue Reading

Popular