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Ancient Village Found In Canada Is Older Than The Egyptian Pyramids

“I remember when we got the dates back, and we just sat back and said, ‘Holy moly, this is old.’”

We generally think of ancient ruins as being found mostly in Europe, Africa or South America where some monuments and buildings have been standing for thousands of years. However, a home recently found in Canada has been carbon-dated and the study suggests that it is even older than the pyramids.

Students from the University of Victoria’s archeology department have unearthed the oldest settlement in North America. They were digging on Triquet Island, which is about 300 miles north of Victoria, British Columbia’s capital when they discovered the ruins.

Researchers from the Hakai Institute and the University of Victoria, with local First Nations members, estimate the settlement is way older than the Giza pyramids and have also found artifacts dating all the way back to the Ice Age. The home was found on the lakeside and was discovered on a new housing estate.

They discovered several artifacts from what appears to be an ancient village, including carved wooden tools and bits of charcoal, in a thin horizontal layer of soil called paleosol.

The researchers determined that the settlement is 14,000 years old. It is much older than the pyramids of Ancient Egypt, which is 4,700 years old.

University of Victoria Ph.D. student Alisha Gauvreau, who was part of the excavation, said:

“I remember when we get [sic] the dates back and we just kind of sat there going, ‘holy moly, this is old.’ What this is doing is just changing our idea of the way in which North America was first peopled.”

William Housty, a member of the Heiltsuk First Nation, said:

“To think about how these stories survived only to be supported by this archeological evidence is just amazing. This find is very important because it reaffirms a lot of the history that our people have been talking about for thousands of years.”

History

World’s Largest Freshwater Pearl Formerly Owned by Catherine the Great Sold At $374,000

The Sleeping Lion was one of the famed empress’ prized jewels.

A freshwater pearl once owned by Catherine the Great was sold for an astounding $374,000 on May 31, 2018. The auction was done by the Amsterdam Pearl Society and was held at The Hague.

Considered as the world's largest pearl, the "Sleeping Lion" (noting its unusual shape) weighs 5.4 ounces and is 2.75 inches in length. According to the Venduehuis auction house catalogue, it was sold below its estimated value, which was was between $397,000 and $630,000.

The unusual shape is responsible for the pearl's name.

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History

Why Is Iceland Green and Why Is Greenland Icy?

This is why I have trust issues…

Countries have interesting origin stories about how they get their names. Generally speaking, country names are either based on the land’s features, a tribe, a person, or even a directional description.

Bahrain, for example, literally means “Two Seas” while United States of America was named after Italian explorer Amerigo Vespucci. On the other hand, Norway, as its name implies, means “The Way North” or “The Northern Way” while Mauritania is based on the Mauris, the country’s largest ethnic group.

It’s when we reach Greenland and Iceland that things get really interesting - and a bit confusing!

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History

Why Sin Eating Was Once The Worst Job In The World

Technically, it was a thankless job.

If you think you are unfortunate for having to hold on to a job that you think sucks, bear in mind that at one point in history, there were people who went the extent of risking their salvation just for money. For the so-called Sin Eaters then, it did not matter if they had to suffer eternal damnation in hell for as long they could eat and have some coins in their pockets.

While a Sin Eater is already a thing of the past, there is no questioning that it held the notion as being the worst job in England, Scotland, and Wales where it was practiced from the Middle Ages until the early 1900s. You see, a Sin Eater had to eat a piece of bread placed on the chest of a dying person, otherwise known as a sin-soaked bread, while the family of the would-be departing person watched, prayed, and drank a flagon of ale.

By eating the sin-soaked bread, it was believed then that a Sin Eater could absolve the dying person from his sins, and his chances of entering heaven would improve. ...

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