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Named As One Of The Ugliest Structures Ever, Torres de Colon Was Built From Top To Bottom

Torres de Colon has been part of Madrid’s skyline since 1976.

Madrid, Spain’s twin towers called Torres de Colon (Columbus Towers) are usually considered by many as the city’s ugliest building. In fact, it has been included in an unofficial list of distasteful buildings in the world. Despite that, one can’t deny that it is an iconic part of Madrid’s skyline since it was erected in 1976.

Specifically located in Plaza de Colon, the building looks like an electrical plug, which is why locals refer to it as “El Enchufe” or “The Plug.” Though not many people find the structure appealing, it still fascinates people because of how it was constructed– from top to bottom.

Torres de Colon stands at 116 meters and has 23 floors.

Source: Interiorator
It is Madrid’s 12th tallest building and is currently valued at $116 million.

Source: Antony Wood
The building is home to offices of different companies and shops.

Source: Interiorator
There are different websites that list Torres de Colon as one of the ugliest building in the world.

But it's still an iconic structure because of the method of its construction.

The construction of Torres de Colon started with two central pillars that stood on concrete footings. The topmost part of the floor was positioned using steel cables. Then the rest of the floor buildings were constructed from the top to bottom. Only the three floors at the bottom, which include the basements, were constructed using the conventional top-to-bottom method.

The top-down construction method is a rather cost-efficient and time-saving method.

Choosing top-down method reduces the overall period of construction since workers can start building the floors above without having to wait for the basement to complete. This means developers can open the building much earlier.

Although it's an unusual method, Torres de Colon is not the only building to have been built that way.

This building in Bulgaria (1977) also used top-down construction method.

This is how a residential block in Magnitogorsk, Russia was built.

And here's how it looks today.

Do you think Torres de Colon deserves the title “ugly”? Let us know in the comments section below.

Interesting

Detailed Map Shows European Equivalent of Game of Thrones’ Westeros and Its Seven Kingdoms

So this is how GRRM built the world of Game of Thrones?

Almost everyone was hooked in the season finale of “Game of Thrones,” and it’s safe to say that everyone wanted more from the show. Alas, we’ll probably have to wait until 2019 before the eight season arrives. So, for now, why don’t we take a plunge at some interesting details about the show?

First and foremost, it can easily be determined that “Game of Thrones” is total fiction. Because seriously, the dragons and white walkers say it all. But interestingly, the author himself George R.R. Martin revealed that he used historical people, events, and places as inspiration to build his world. This is where the idea of Westeros and its Seven Kingdoms having real-world equivalent – Europe, that is – surfaced.

There are really numerous similarities that somehow connect the two. For instance, the Seven Kingdoms share the same common language called the Common Tongue. The latter is quite diverse in terms of culture, history, ancestry, and even religion – all of which are as diverse as Europe. ...

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History

Egypt Isn’t the Country With The Most Pyramids; This Country Has 255 Of Them

Kings and queens were buried in the pyramid tombs.

When someone says "pyramid," the first thing that comes to mind is Egypt. The country is known for its historical and jaw-dropping structures from thousands of years ago. But there's another country that has quite a number of pyramids to show off: Sudan. How did this Northern African country come to have its own towering pyramids? It all has to do with history and Egypt's influence on the country.

The area of the Nile Valley known as Nubia in present-day Sudan was home to three Kushite kingdoms. The first had its capital at Kerma (2600–1520 BC), the second at Napata (1000–300 BC), and the last at Meroë (300 BC–AD 300). Kerma had its own architectural style and burial customs, while Napata and Meroë were heavily influenced by Egypt.

The Kushite kingdoms competed strongly with Egypt in terms of economy and military.

Outdoor Revival reports that in 751 BC, Kushite King Piankhi overthrew the 24th Dynasty and united the entire Nile Valley under his rule. Piankhi and his successors ruled as pharaohs of the 25th Dynasty, and the Napatan domination ended with the Assyrian conquest of Egypt in 656 BC....

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Others

10 Animals People Worshipped and Considered Sacred

Although some of them were deemed holy, people would still sacrifice them in the most brutal ways.

Religion is a very interesting topic in the society. Its existence dates back to the archaic times, when people worshipped bushes and rocks, among many others. While the debate of which denomination stands religiously correct, we can’t help but be fascinated with their tenets.

If Christianity believes in the holy trinity (i.e. Jesus, God, and the Holy Spirit), other religions speak differently. Some of them are into incarnation, a process in which a god enters the world as a living thing (e.g. human, plants, or animals). Regardless of how it’s conceived, incarnation is merely about a divine creator taking a physical form.

In this list, we’ll tackle animals that people worshipped and considered holy. Here are ten examples of them.

#10. Petsuchos the Crocodile

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