Connect with us

Travel

Breathtaking Images From the 2015 National Geographic Travel Photo Contest

Posted

(

)

A A A

It is really remarkable to see the best photos of amateur and professional photographers around the world. The National Geographic Traveler Photo Contest committee has already picked the most beautiful and exceptional photographs for 2015. They selected the winners from over 18,000 global entries in categories of Travel Portraits, Sense of Place, Spontaneous Moments, and Outdoor Scenes. All winners will receive Traveler Magazine subscriptions.

More info: www.nationalgeographic.com

Let us now witness these wonderful and one-of-kind pictures from 2015 National Geographic Traveler Photo Contest.

Let’s start with the Merit Winners. Merit Winners will have $200 gift certificate for B & H Photo and course DVD copy of National Geographic Masters of Photography. Here’s the the Merit Winners:

#1. Sauna in the Sky

A sauna at 2,800 meters high in the heart of Dolomites. Monte Lagazuoi, Cortina, eastern Italian Alps.

A sauna at 2,800 meters high in the heart of Dolomites. Monte Lagazuoi, Cortina, eastern Italian Alps. Photo and caption: Stefano Zardini

#2. Romania, Land of Fairy Tales

Romania, land of fairy tales. White frost over Pestera village.

Romania, land of fairy tales. White frost over Pestera village. Photo and caption: Eduard Gutescu

#3. A Night at Deadvlei

The night before returning to Windhoek, we spent several hours at Deadvlei. The moon was bright enough to illuminate the sand dunes in the distance, but the skies were still dark enough to clearly see the Milky Way and Magellanic Clouds. Deadvlei means "dead marsh." The camelthorn trees are believed to be about 900 years old but have not decomposed because the environment is so dry.

The night before returning to Windhoek, we spent several hours at Deadvlei. The moon was bright enough to illuminate the sand dunes in the distance, but the skies were still dark enough to clearly see the Milky Way and Magellanic Clouds. Deadvlei means “dead marsh.” The camelthorn trees are believed to be about 900 years old but have not decomposed because the environment is so dry. Photo and caption: Beth McCarley

(Continue reading next page…)

View Comments

Follow On Facebook




Popular