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Listen To The Oldest Music Composed by Man, Dating Back to 1400 BC!

Have you ever pondered when did man started making music? Or have you thought what the oldest music sounds like? The answer to those questions were found by archaeologists at an excavation in Ras Shamra, Syria during the 1950s.

In an expedition there, archaeologists excavated Babylonian cuneiform tablets with what looked like musical melody. Carbon dating suggests that the musical inscriptions were at least 3,500 years old dating back to at least 1400-1700 B.C. So far, this is recognized as the oldest music composed by mankind.

The Four-part ancient musical composition

Emmanuel Laroche and Professor Kilmer with other scholars helped decipher the inscriptions. While, Michael Levy a lyre player, recreated the sound to make the oldest music alive again.

Scholars deciphered and translated the inscriptions to its modern-day musical note equivalents

Listen to the oldest music composed by man here:

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Relaxing and quite beautiful isn’t it? According to the scholars, the music written in the fragments of cuneiform clay tablets are a hymn for the Goddess Nikkal, the Semitic Goddess of Orchards. It suggests a hymn offering for a bountiful harvest. The scholars further note that the inscriptions may have come from the Hurrian tribe from Canaan. Four names were signed on the melody: Tapšiẖuni, Puẖiya(na), Urẖiya and Ammiya.

Aside from the big clay tablet, other smaller hymns were found

Aside from the inscriptions, the cuneiform tablet also has instructions on the playing of the music. There were instructions to play the song on a sammun or an ancient type of 9-stringed harp or lyre as well as voice accompaniment. The entire collection of the cuneiform musical inscriptions are available for viewing at the National Museum of Damascus. Other composers and musicians such as Michael Levy, and Marcelle Duchesne-Guillemin try to reconstruct the compositions.

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Source: Vintage News

Art

8 Public Spaces that Manipulate You with Their Frustrating Design

Strangely, some things are unpleasantly made to discourage their use for certain activities.

Unpleasant design is all around us. We see them in signs with awful fonts, in badly placed buildings, and even in household items like furniture and kitchenware. However, who would have thought that unpleasant design could have a purpose?

In the book called "Unpleasant Design" by Gordan Savičić and Selena Savić, they discuss how some designs intentionally make people feel uncomfortable, and thus limiting the use of certain objects to their only intended use. Here are some examples of designs they have seen in public spaces.

1. Metal obstacles in public benches

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These Monochromatic Optical Illusions by Peter Kogler Will Surely Make You Dizzy

These artworks will induce vertigo!

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For decades, world-renowned Austrian artist Peter Kogler has successfully transformed typical-looking galleries and museums into warp portals where hallucination and reality seem to converge. Using illusory, monochromatic patterns of distorted lines and pipes and similarly warped sculptures, he expertly transports his audiences to a different dimension where their depth perception is put to the test. The seemingly boundless patterns of alternating convex and concave offer a three-dimensional view of a world that appears to move and shift with every step.

First gaining international attention in the 1980s, the Vienna-based artist is a pioneer of computer-generated art. His works, which focus on architecture, cinema, minimalism and pop art, have been displayed in various galleries, museums, and exhibitions, all of which never fail to captivate.

Kogler's motifs are drawn from the corporal and allegorical realms and then blended into a mixture of unique designs, as can be seen in the patterns that he employs, examples of which include pipes, ants, brain convolutions, and honeycombs....

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Japanese Instagram Users Are Sharing Photos Of Fallen Leaves Artworks . They’re Pretty Stunning!

Wow! This is so impressive!

Instagram users over at the Land of the Rising Sun are sharing with us some photos of amazing artworks made with fallen leaves. Yes, you read that right – fallen leaves!

Who would’ve thought that leaves can be a medium for art, right?

Most of us would have simply swept those leaves away and threw them into the dumpsters but apparently, some locals thought they made interesting materials for creating pieces of art. ...

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