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Egypt’s 3,500-Year-Old Luxor Tombs Will Soon Be Open To Tourists

Egypt hopes that these tombs will drive more tourists into the country.

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Egypt is home to stunning ancient monuments that never fail to captivate those who are usually fascinated with historical places. It is easily one of the favorite holiday destinations for tourists. However, the country has been struggling in the tourism department in the wake of extremist attacks and political uprising in 2011.

In the hopes of attracting more visitors, the country just opened two unexplored tombs in Luxor that are 3,500 years old. The two tombs discovered in Luxor are located on the west bank of the famous Nile River, in a cemetery where high officials and noblemen are buried.

The Luxor tombs are called “Kampp 161” and “Kampp 150.”

They were discovered — although left unexplored — since the 90s.

Source: AP
Egypt hopes that opening the tombs to the public will improve the country’s tourism.

Source: AP

“It’s truly an exceptional day,” Antiquities Minister Khaled al-Anani told AP. “The 18th dynasty private tombs were already known. But it’s the first time to enter inside the two tombs.”

German archaeologist Frederica Kampp found those tombs in the 1990s and gave them their respective names. Kampp began excavating 157 but the work was halted when she reached the entrance.

That meant Kampp wasn’t able to enter it. On the other hand, Kampp 161 was never excavated, the antiquities ministry said.

About 450 statues were found in the tombs.

Source: AP
This colorful mural was found on Kampp 161’s west wall.

Source: AP
This was a funeral furniture found in the tomb.

Source: AP
And of course, this mummy was discovered inside Kampp 157.

Source: AP

Among the artifacts discovered are painted wooden masks used in funerals, 450 statues, a mummy, clay vessels and funerary cones. A cartouche was found caved on the ceilings and it had the name of King Thutmose I of the 18th dynasty, the ministry confirmed. The excavation of these tombs is one of the many recently conducted in Luxor.

History

Stunning Photographs Reveal Sunken Luxurious Roman City Lost for 1,700 Years

The sunken city of Baiae is like Las Vegas in ancient times.

The ancient city of Baiae in Rome is being compared to Las Vegas, in which it was a blooming area frequented by the nation’s rich and famous personalities. Baiae was once a popular resort where the elites and emperors expend their wealth and enjoy lavish parties. But 1,700 years ago, this grand city lost its vibrancy after nature took a lash at it and made it disappear beneath the waves.

Fast forward to many thousand years later, the site was rediscovered by an expedition team and it was found that most of the statues and mosaics have been beautifully preserved. Italian photographer Antonio Busiello captured stunning images of the old prosperous city, giving people a glimpse of what the luxurious playground was like in ancient Rome.

The sunken city of Baiae is found in the Gulf of Naples, Italy.

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History

Man Discovers Ancient Tomb When He Tries to Fix Toilet in His Property

At first, Faggiano kept the discovery secret, even from his wife.

Eight years ago, Lucian Faggiano bought a building at 56 Via Ascanio Grandi in Lecce, Puglia in Italy and planned to open a trattoria, an eatery that is somewhere between a restaurant and a fast food joint. The 60-year old Faggiano worked on renovations right away after purchasing the building. The toilet was blocked, so he and his two sons decided to dig a trench to solve the problem.

What was supposed to take around a week to accomplish led to years of waiting for his beloved trattoria to open, thanks to a remarkable discovery on his property.

Faggiano and his sons uncovered an ancient stone floor covering a Messapian burial tomb while they were trying to find the toilet plumbing.

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History

Remembering Doña Paz, The Deadliest Shipwreck In History Worse Than The Titanic

In remembrance of its 30th anniversary. May all the victims rest in peace.

Many people think that the sinking of the Titanic is the worst maritime disaster, but there is a disaster worse than the popular shipwreck. The Philippines will be forever haunted by the tragedy of MV Doña Paz that recorded over 4,000 fatalities.

It will be 30 years since MV Doña Paz burned in the Philippine waters. On the unfortunate day of December 20, 1987, five days before Christmas, the passenger ferry collided with oil tanker MT Vector carrying 8,000 barrels of gasoline and kerosene that left an estimated death toll of 4,386 people and only 24 survivors.

MV Doña Paz is overloaded with more than 4,386 people.

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