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‘World’s Loneliest Bird’ Found Dead Next to Concrete Bird He Wooed for Years

RIP, Nigel the gannet.

For years, the ‘world’s loneliest bird‘ persevered to woo his rather stone-cold love interest. Nigel, a gannet, showed up on Mana Island in New Zealand in 2015, where he met the apple of his eye. The only problem was that his potential mate was made of concrete.

Some 20 years ago, conservationists in New Zealand planted 80 fake gannet birds on the island as part of their efforts to attract real gannets. Nigel was the only one to show up after many years, and he was the first gannet to make Mana his home in 40 years.

Every day since his arrival on the island, Nigel wooed his potential partner.

The conservationists reported that Nigel even built a nest from seaweed, twigs, and mud for his concrete love interest. Sadly and expectedly, his efforts were never reciprocated. In a tragic turn of events, Nigel was recently found dead next to his concrete love. Chris Bell, a ranger for the New Zealand Department of Conservation, was quoted by The Guardian:

“I think it must have been quite a frustrating existence. Whether or not he was lonely, he certainly never got anything back, and that must have been very strange experience, when he spent years courting. I think we all have a lot of empathy for him, because he had this fairly hopeless situation.”

Not only did Nigel experience unrequited love, he also remained all alone until the last of his days.

The poor bird didn’t even have other real gannets to keep him company until his last days on earth. Although three other gannets recently showed up on the island, they stayed on the opposite end of the colony. Poor Nigel, on the other hand, stayed with his concrete pals and his immovable love interest.

Volunteers continue to do their best to attract other birds to the island. They’ve maintained the fake birds by painting them regularly; they even paint fake bird droppings on the ground. But they believe the recently installed speaker system with fake bird calls was the one that attracted the three new gannets.

Bell believes Nigel did not die in vain.

According to him:

“He was an attraction that helped bring in other birds. Gannets like to nest where a gannet has nested before. It’s really sad he died, but it wasn’t for nothing.”

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Rare Walking Fish With Hands Discovered Off Tasmanian Coast

The red handfish is not a good swimmer, so it walks on the seabed.

Every now and then, rare and weird creatures from across the globe make grand appearances. Scientists discover rare species one after another. Now, a team of divers has discovered a small population of fish that "walk" along the seabed off Australia's south coast in Tasmania.

What's weird is that this rare fish population has finger-like fins that help them walk across the surface of the ocean. Dubbed as the Red Handfish (Thymichthys politus), this is one of the rarest fish species in the world.

Today, only 20 to 40 individuals of these fishes have been found worldwide.

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Eastern Puma Officially Extinct, Experts Declare

The last living eastern puma, mountain lion or cougar sighting was in 1938.

The Eastern Puma, also called the cougar, mountain lion, panther and catamount, has been declared officially extinct, according to a federal agency.

The US Fish and Wildlife Service declared the Eastern puma, which was last sighted 80 years ago, extinct, lifting all protection programs for the animal. The Eastern Puma has now been removed from the list of endangered species for the last time.

The animal roamed areas in Michigan, New England, Southern Ontario, the Carolinas, and Tennessee.

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Giant Centipede Can Devour Prey 15 Times Their Size In 30 Seconds

A bite from these venomous centipedes can be really deadly.

A shocking footage shows a giant centipede killing a prey 15 times its size in just seconds, thanks to a deadly venom scientists have identified.

In the ecosystem, most predators hunt and kill smaller animals. However, in a new footage released by scientists, a golden head centipede (Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans) can devour its prey, even larger ones, in just seconds by releasing a very deadly venom.

Now, the scientists have identified the toxin, dubbed as the Ssm Spooky Toxin, that makes the centipede's venom so fatal.

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