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DNA Reveals ‘Powerful Viking’ Remains Belonged To A Female Warrior Commander

For over 130 years, researchers assumed the remains were of a man.

For 130 long years, researchers and scholars assumed that the remains of a Viking warrior and military leader found in Sweden many years ago were of a man. Now, thanks to DNA testing and modern technology, it has been proven that the ancient high-ranking military officer was actually a woman.

The findings were published in the American Journal of Physical Anthropology, and it raises provocative questions about gender roles in ancient society. The discovery is proof that researchers must stop assuming that ancient remains of high-ranking individuals are by default male.

It is often assumed that ancient societies were male dominated, but archaeological discoveries have proven that women also played vital leadership roles.

The researchers wrote:

“The identification of a female Viking warrior provides a unique insight into the Viking society, social constructions, and exceptions to the norm in the Viking time-period. The results call for caution against generalizations regarding social orders in past societies.”

The remains were discovered back in the 1880s but were tested for DNA only recently. The body was reportedly found with a sword, an ax, a spear, armor-piercing arrows, a bottle knife, two shields, and two horses. The objects suggest that the remains belong to a warrior.

There were also gaming pieces found b***** with the body.

Charlotte Hedenstierna-Jonson, an archaeologist at Sweden’s Uppsala University, told the Swedish publication The Local:

“It’s actually a woman, somewhere over the age of 30 and fairly tall too, measuring around 170 centimetres. Aside from the complete warrior equipment b***** along with her… she had a board game in her lap, or more of a war-planning game used to try out battle tactics and strategies, which indicates she was a powerful military leader. She’s most likely planned, led and taken part in battles.”

The drawing, right, is a reconstruction of how the grave with the woman originally may have looked.

What do you think of this discovery? Share your thoughts in the comments section.

History

World’s Largest Freshwater Pearl Formerly Owned by Catherine the Great Sold At $374,000

The Sleeping Lion was one of the famed empress’ prized jewels.

A freshwater pearl once owned by Catherine the Great was sold for an astounding $374,000 on May 31, 2018. The auction was done by the Amsterdam Pearl Society and was held at The Hague.

Considered as the world's largest pearl, the "Sleeping Lion" (noting its unusual shape) weighs 5.4 ounces and is 2.75 inches in length. According to the Venduehuis auction house catalogue, it was sold below its estimated value, which was was between $397,000 and $630,000.

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History

Why Is Iceland Green and Why Is Greenland Icy?

This is why I have trust issues…

Countries have interesting origin stories about how they get their names. Generally speaking, country names are either based on the land’s features, a tribe, a person, or even a directional description.

Bahrain, for example, literally means “Two Seas” while United States of America was named after Italian explorer Amerigo Vespucci. On the other hand, Norway, as its name implies, means “The Way North” or “The Northern Way” while Mauritania is based on the Mauris, the country’s largest ethnic group.

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History

Why Sin Eating Was Once The Worst Job In The World

Technically, it was a thankless job.

If you think you are unfortunate for having to hold on to a job that you think sucks, bear in mind that at one point in history, there were people who went the extent of risking their salvation just for money. For the so-called Sin Eaters then, it did not matter if they had to suffer eternal damnation in hell for as long they could eat and have some coins in their pockets.

While a Sin Eater is already a thing of the past, there is no questioning that it held the notion as being the worst job in England, Scotland, and Wales where it was practiced from the Middle Ages until the early 1900s. You see, a Sin Eater had to eat a piece of bread placed on the chest of a dying person, otherwise known as a sin-soaked bread, while the family of the would-be departing person watched, prayed, and drank a flagon of ale.

By eating the sin-soaked bread, it was believed then that a Sin Eater could absolve the dying person from his sins, and his chances of entering heaven would improve.

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