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DNA Reveals ‘Powerful Viking’ Remains Belonged To A Female Warrior Commander

For over 130 years, researchers assumed the remains were of a man.

For 130 long years, researchers and scholars assumed that the remains of a Viking warrior and military leader found in Sweden many years ago were of a man. Now, thanks to DNA testing and modern technology, it has been proven that the ancient high-ranking military officer was actually a woman.

The findings were published in the American Journal of Physical Anthropology, and it raises provocative questions about gender roles in ancient society. The discovery is proof that researchers must stop assuming that ancient remains of high-ranking individuals are by default male.

It is often assumed that ancient societies were male dominated, but archaeological discoveries have proven that women also played vital leadership roles.

The researchers wrote:

“The identification of a female Viking warrior provides a unique insight into the Viking society, social constructions, and exceptions to the norm in the Viking time-period. The results call for caution against generalizations regarding social orders in past societies.”

The remains were discovered back in the 1880s but were tested for DNA only recently. The body was reportedly found with a sword, an ax, a spear, armor-piercing arrows, a bottle knife, two shields, and two horses. The objects suggest that the remains belong to a warrior.

There were also gaming pieces found buried with the body.

Charlotte Hedenstierna-Jonson, an archaeologist at Sweden’s Uppsala University, told the Swedish publication The Local:

“It’s actually a woman, somewhere over the age of 30 and fairly tall too, measuring around 170 centimetres. Aside from the complete warrior equipment buried along with her… she had a board game in her lap, or more of a war-planning game used to try out battle tactics and strategies, which indicates she was a powerful military leader. She’s most likely planned, led and taken part in battles.”

The drawing, right, is a reconstruction of how the grave with the woman originally may have looked.

What do you think of this discovery? Share your thoughts in the comments section.

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9 Interesting Facts About Al Capone

The Scarface was indeed a strange and interesting guy.

Almost everyone in this world knows Al Capone as someone who was badass. Widely known as “Scarface,” the notorious US gangster was among America’s most feared gang leaders. And, of course, there was every reason to be. Although the infamous (and bloody) St. Valentine’s Day Massacre brought him his downfall, this guy lived to be a legend.

The massacre, in particular, saw at least seven rival gang members brutally gunned down. Unfortunately for Capone, this severely damaged his public reputation. This mess particularly hurt his image in Chicago where he had built up his criminal empire.

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US Army Built a Fake Town to Hide Boeing Factory From Air Strikes During WWII

Consider the cost of each plane, the military really had to go the extra mile.

During the infamous World War 2, one B-17 Bomber would cost more or less $200,000 to produce. And in today’s economy, it is around $3.4 million. With the US Army requesting thousands of these planes, they would take every possible measure just to secure the Boeing factory responsible for creating them. And believe it or not, by “every possible measure” they mean hiring Hollywood set designers.

Well, that is because they wanted to build a fake neighborhood atop it. And in order to make it look very real, they also hired dozens of actors to live in the area. They believed that by doing so, they could protect the factory from any potential air strike. The so-called neighborhood was built sometime in 1944, though it was removed a year after.

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The 1918 Flu Pandemic That Paved the Way for Women Workers and the Rise of Women’s Rights

One of the world’s worst natural disasters opened up new roles for women.

In 1918, one of the world's worst catastrophes affected one-third of the world's population. The influenza pandemic of 1918, also known as the Spanish flu, reportedly affected 500 million people across the globe and killed 50 to 100 million individuals. In the US, it reportedly took away 670,000 lives. It's considered one of the deadliest natural disasters in human history.

While the 1918 flu pandemic is infamous for killing millions, it did something else to change societal norms. In particular, it led to more opportunities for women and the rise of women's rights.

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