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This Pair of Ancient Skeletons Has Been Locked in Embrace for 6,000 Years

The Lovers of Valdaro wowed the world when they were discovered in 2007.

In 2007, at a Neolithic tomb in San Giorgio near Mantua, Italy, archaeologists made a fascinating discovery – the Lovers of Valdaro. Also called the Valdaro Lovers, the pair of skeletons is believed to date back approximately 6,000 years. The two skeletons, locked in eternal embrace, appear to have been buried facing each other.

Archaeologist Elena Maria Menotti led the excavation of the skeletons. According to her team’s findings, the pair are male and female, not older than 20 years old, and about 5’2″ (157 cm) in height. Menotti decided that the couple should not be separated and that their unique position should be preserved. And so during the excavation, the team dug up the block of earth in which the skeletons were found and placed them in a box.

The Lovers of Valdaro were discovered in San Giorgio near Mantua, Italy, in 2007.

The male skeleton was discovered with a flint arrowhead near the neck, while the female skeleton had a long flint blade along the thigh and two flint knives under the pelvis. Researchers say these items were most likely buried with the two people as grave goods since there were no signs of violent death like fractures and microtrauma.

The pair of skeletons are believed to be of a male and a female person no older than 20 years old.

It is strongly believed that the pair was buried facing each other. But what’s fascinating is that during the Neolithic period, where it is believed they belong, double burials were very uncommon. This makes the Valdaro Lovers’ position very unique. They are the only case of double burial discovered in Northern Italy. From the site of their discovery, the Lovers of Valdaro were sent to the Musei Civici in Como.

They have been locked in embrace for 6,000 years.

In September 2011, the Lovers of Valdaro were briefly displayed in public for the first time at the entrance of Mantua’s Archaeological Museum. An association called Lovers in Mantua is seeking a permanent home for the two skeletons. The organization’s president, professor Silvia Bagnoli, has been actively campaigning for the two ancient lovers to have a permanent exhibit of their own.

Their position was preserved even after excavation.

According the professor, around €250,000 can cover the Lovers of Valdaro’s own exhibition center, and an additional €200,000 could be used for a multimedia space through which people can learn of the ancient lovers’ story.

History

This Newly Discovered 14,000-Year-Old Settlement Can Change North American History

It is three times older than the Pyramids of Giza.

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A 14,000-year-old settlement has been recently discovered along the coastline in Canada. This scientific discovery corroborates with ancient stories that have originated from the indigenous Heiltsuk Nation people, saying that their ancestors hailed from a mysterious settlement somewhere along Canada's coastline during the last Ice Age.

The settlement was found last year, lying somewhere along the British Columbia's Central Coast on Triquet Island. Archaeologists from the University of Victoria, Hakai Institute, and local First Nations found remnants of charcoal and ancient tools such as fish hooks, spears, and a hand drill used to light fires.

Analysis of the charcoal found on the site revealed that the settlement is around 13,613 to 14,086 years old, making this community one of the oldest human settlements ever found in North America. The site is twice as old as the wheel and is three times older than the Pyramids of Giza.

The 14,000-year-old settlement on the coast of Canada is one of the oldest in North America.

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History

It Was Once Someone’s Job to Talk to the King While He Sat on the Toilet

Being the Groom of the Stool was a highly coveted position in the royal house.

Even a king has a daily duty to attend to, but of course, he can't be expected to do it on his own. From the 1500s to the 1700s, British kings chose lucky nobles to be their Groom of the Stool, a once highly coveted position in the royal house. The task? To chat with the king while he did his business on his luxurious, velvet-cushioned toilet called the 'close stool.'

The job might not seem glamorous, but many desired the position for good reason. Every day, as the king sat on his other throne, he unloaded in more ways than one. He revealed secrets, shared his innermost thoughts, asked for counsel, and even listened to the woes of his personal groom and offered to help.

The King of England’s toilet was a velvet-cushioned portable seat, below which was a pewter chamber pot enclosed in a wooden box.

One of the earliest mentions of the job appears in The Private Lives of the Tudors, where Tracy Borman quoted a written order from 1479 from Hugh Denys, “our Groom of the Stool,” which included “black velvet and fringed with silk, two pewter basins and four broad yards of tawny cloth” for him to build a close stool. Borman also referenced instructions from 1452 in the Book of Nurture , which included a rhyme to help new grooms remember their tasks:...

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History

Native Americans Acknowledged 5 Genders Before Being Influenced By Europeans

Native Americans valued people for their contributions to the tribe – not for their masculinity or femininity.

Before Europeans took over North America, Native Americans didn't have strict gender roles. There were no set gender norms for tribe members to follow in order to be accepted in the community, and showing both feminine and masculine traits were not frowned upon.

In fact, Native Americans considered people with both male and female characteristics as gifts by nature able to view both sides of everything. Native Americans had the following genders: male, female, Two Spirit female, Two Spirit male, and transgendered.

Native Americans did not enforce strict genders roles in their tribes.

In Winnipeg, Manitoba in 1989, LGBT Native Americans wanting to be identified in their tribes officially adopted the term "Two Spirit" from the Ojibwe language. Tribes still keep their own terms, but there was a need to have a universal term that the general public could understand. ...

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