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Japanese Hotel Uses “Self Parking” Slippers Created By Nissan

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Slippers that “park” themselves at the hotel entrance for guests to use? If it’s in technology-crazy Japan, it’s totally possible. In a collaboration with Nissan, a company that goes beyond manufacturing cars, ProPilot Park Ryokan inn will be featuring self-driving slippers that operate at the push of a button.

The slippers use Nissan’s ProPilot Park technology and are each equipped with two tiny wheels, a motor, and a sensor. The technology used for the slippers is the same as the one in Nissan’s latest version of its all-battery electric Leaf vehicle, which come with high-tech sensors and cameras that allow the automobile to locate and park driver-less.

Guests will be greeted by these slippers at the entrance.

So how does the ProPilot techology work? According to Daily Mail:

“It uses four high-resolution cameras capable of real-time image processing and 12 sonar sensors placed around the vehicle to assess the vehicle’s surroundings.”

“Drivers activate the technology by pressing a button. The button must be held the entire time, unlike the hands-free Tesla Model S.”

“Taking a finger off the button will cause the vehicle to stop immediately.”

“Drivers can apply breaks if necessary, but ProPilot Park otherwise handles the accelerator, braking and steering input when the car is parking.”

The self-driving slippers wese created to reduce staff load at the hotel and promote autonomous vehicles.

It is scheduled to be used by selected guests this March.

The technology was also incorporated into traditional low tables and floor cushions so they can wheel themselves into place.

The ProPilot Park Ryokan inn is located around 47 miles southwest of Tokyo and boasts magnificent views of Mount Fuji.

“The self-parking slippers are meant to raise awareness of automated driving technologies, and their potential, non-driving applications,” said Nick Maxfield, a spokesman for Nissan.

Nissan, who produced self-driving office chairs in 2016, plans to release a self-driving car on the streets by 2020.

Watch the video to see the technology in action:

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