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Stunning Photographs Reveal Sunken Luxurious Roman City Lost for 1,700 Years

The sunken city of Baiae is like Las Vegas in ancient times.

The ancient city of Baiae in Rome is being compared to Las Vegas, in which it was a blooming area frequented by the nation’s rich and famous personalities. Baiae was once a popular resort where the elites and emperors expend their wealth and enjoy lavish parties. But 1,700 years ago, this grand city lost its vibrancy after nature took a lash at it and made it disappear beneath the waves.

Fast forward to many thousand years later, the site was rediscovered by an expedition team and it was found that most of the statues and mosaics have been beautifully preserved. Italian photographer Antonio Busiello captured stunning images of the old prosperous city, giving people a glimpse of what the luxurious playground was like in ancient Rome.

The sunken city of Baiae is found in the Gulf of Naples, Italy.

Baiae was once a spot frequented by the rich and famous of Ancient Rome.

Personalities like Julius Caesar, Nero, Pompey the Great, Marius, and Hadrian used to visit the city…

Before volcanic activity caused it to retreat below the waters.

Scientists have discovered that the villas in the area were made from the finest white marble.

Much of Baiae was lost to the waves as volcanic activity resulted in the entire city being submerged underwater into the Gulf of Naples of today. In 2014, the south of Naples experienced heavy flooding that caused landslides, which then exposed portions of the old Baiae.

Continuous landslides in 2014 exposed the hidden sunken city.

Recently, divers were allowed to explore the sunken site to take photos.

A team of divers discovered numerous ruins and Roman monuments.

Busiello said diving here is like "a dive into history."

Busiello, who lives in Naples, managed to photograph Baiae and found that mosaics and statues remain well-preserved across centuries. The 45-year-old said that the city was considered as one of Rome’s most important cities.

“The beautiful mosaics, and the villas and temples that have reemerged or are still underwater show the opulence and wealth of this area.It was considered one of the most important Roman cities for centuries. Pliny the Younger used to live here and from here, across the gulf, he witnessed and described the 79 AD eruption of Mount Vesuvius that destroyed Pompeii and Herculaneum.”

The gorgeous town once had cobbled streets, statues, mosaics, and spas. Julius Caesar and Emperor Nero’s luxurious villas were found here as well. The site was also a place where temples dedicated to Venus, Diana and Mercury were erected.

Baiae was left untouched for centuries and because of that, it has become a sanctuary for sea creatures.

Pisoni and Protiro villas are visible on site.

Intricate mosaic designs and residential rooms can also be seen.

Divers have also found many treasures still intact.

Historians claim that the city is synonymous to wickedness and luxury.

Following the discovery of the d****** city, scientists from Italy’s University of Calabria and Spanish researcher, Mónica Alvarez de Buergo, worked together to analyze one of Baiae villa’s most valuable elements: the white marble. The team took the plunge to determine the type of material used for the construction of the beautiful villas that remain intact today.

The analyses were published in Applied Surface Science journal and it confirmed that the marble came from quarries in Italy, Turkey, and Greece.

Watch the video below to see the team’s exploration of the sunken city of Baiae.

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History

World’s Largest Freshwater Pearl Formerly Owned by Catherine the Great Sold At $374,000

The Sleeping Lion was one of the famed empress’ prized jewels.

A freshwater pearl once owned by Catherine the Great was sold for an astounding $374,000 on May 31, 2018. The auction was done by the Amsterdam Pearl Society and was held at The Hague.

Considered as the world's largest pearl, the "Sleeping Lion" (noting its unusual shape) weighs 5.4 ounces and is 2.75 inches in length. According to the Venduehuis auction house catalogue, it was sold below its estimated value, which was was between $397,000 and $630,000.

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History

Why Is Iceland Green and Why Is Greenland Icy?

This is why I have trust issues…

Countries have interesting origin stories about how they get their names. Generally speaking, country names are either based on the land’s features, a tribe, a person, or even a directional description.

Bahrain, for example, literally means “Two Seas” while United States of America was named after Italian explorer Amerigo Vespucci. On the other hand, Norway, as its name implies, means “The Way North” or “The Northern Way” while Mauritania is based on the Mauris, the country’s largest ethnic group.

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History

Why Sin Eating Was Once The Worst Job In The World

Technically, it was a thankless job.

If you think you are unfortunate for having to hold on to a job that you think sucks, bear in mind that at one point in history, there were people who went the extent of risking their salvation just for money. For the so-called Sin Eaters then, it did not matter if they had to suffer eternal damnation in hell for as long they could eat and have some coins in their pockets.

While a Sin Eater is already a thing of the past, there is no questioning that it held the notion as being the worst job in England, Scotland, and Wales where it was practiced from the Middle Ages until the early 1900s. You see, a Sin Eater had to eat a piece of bread placed on the chest of a dying person, otherwise known as a sin-soaked bread, while the family of the would-be departing person watched, prayed, and drank a flagon of ale.

By eating the sin-soaked bread, it was believed then that a Sin Eater could absolve the dying person from his sins, and his chances of entering heaven would improve.

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