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Called The ‘Wheel Of Giants,’ The Rumj El-Hiri Has Left Experts Baffled For Centuries

Although hardly visible from the ground, this mysterious monument’s patterns look truly impressive from the air.

Some ancient structures can really be shrouded with mystery. Case in point, the Rujm el-Hiri may simply be a bunch of stone circles for casual observers but there’s something about it that makes it particularly interesting.

Besides, the large stone monument has patterns that are hardly visible from the ground but are, quite impressively, only visible from the air.

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Source: Flickr

The pile of stone rings form what appears to be a design of a wheel!

Located at Golan Heights, the pre-historic ruins were discovered by Israeli archeologists in 1967 after the territory was captured from the Syrians. It was there all along, sitting in plain sight until its discovery.

Rujm el-Hiri’s walls measure six feet in high with only its central mound being higher than the rest.

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Source: Flickr

Meanwhile, the stone circle measures 160 meters across. Until now, researchers are left baffled about the structure’s purpose as well as who built them in the first place.

According to estimates, it probably dates back to Early Bronze Age II (3000 to 2700 BC) which means the monument may be around 5,000 years old.

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Source: Flickr

It is absolutely one of the region’s biggest and oldest structures.

Watch this video here and take a look:

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The name Rujm el-Hiri, given by Syrians, literally means “stone heap of the wild cat” in the Arabic language. In Hebrew, however, it is named Gilgal Refaim, which means the “wheel of Refaim.” “Refaim” refers to an ancient race of giants as mentioned in the Holy Bible.

It is, therefore, not surprising that some theorists are saying that the huge monument may have been built by giants – or by extra terrestrial beings, maybe?

Share your thoughts with us in the comment section!

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World’s Largest Freshwater Pearl Formerly Owned by Catherine the Great Sold At $374,000

The Sleeping Lion was one of the famed empress’ prized jewels.

A freshwater pearl once owned by Catherine the Great was sold for an astounding $374,000 on May 31, 2018. The auction was done by the Amsterdam Pearl Society and was held at The Hague.

Considered as the world's largest pearl, the "Sleeping Lion" (noting its unusual shape) weighs 5.4 ounces and is 2.75 inches in length. According to the Venduehuis auction house catalogue, it was sold below its estimated value, which was was between $397,000 and $630,000.

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Why Is Iceland Green and Why Is Greenland Icy?

This is why I have trust issues…

Countries have interesting origin stories about how they get their names. Generally speaking, country names are either based on the land’s features, a tribe, a person, or even a directional description.

Bahrain, for example, literally means “Two Seas” while United States of America was named after Italian explorer Amerigo Vespucci. On the other hand, Norway, as its name implies, means “The Way North” or “The Northern Way” while Mauritania is based on the Mauris, the country’s largest ethnic group.

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Why Sin Eating Was Once The Worst Job In The World

Technically, it was a thankless job.

If you think you are unfortunate for having to hold on to a job that you think sucks, bear in mind that at one point in history, there were people who went the extent of risking their salvation just for money. For the so-called Sin Eaters then, it did not matter if they had to suffer eternal damnation in hell for as long they could eat and have some coins in their pockets.

While a Sin Eater is already a thing of the past, there is no questioning that it held the notion as being the worst job in England, Scotland, and Wales where it was practiced from the Middle Ages until the early 1900s. You see, a Sin Eater had to eat a piece of bread placed on the chest of a dying person, otherwise known as a sin-soaked bread, while the family of the would-be departing person watched, prayed, and drank a flagon of ale.

By eating the sin-soaked bread, it was believed then that a Sin Eater could absolve the dying person from his sins, and his chances of entering heaven would improve.

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