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Murphy’s Haystacks: South Australia’s 1,500 Million Years Old Stonehenge

These rock formations are the popular tourist attraction on the Eyre Peninsula, South Australia.

Mich Escultura

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In Mortana, off the Flinders Highway between Port Kenny and Streaky Bay on the Eyre Peninsula, you’ll find these rock formations that you may genuinely think are haystacks from a distance!

You’d have thought you were looking at giant haystacks from a distance!

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It’s said that sometime at the start of the 1900s, an agricultural adviser was passing by and saw these giant wind-word boulders. He initially thought they were haystacks and asked the owner of the property, Murphy, how they could produce so much hay. He remarked, “the farmer must have harrowed his land to produce such an impressive abundance of hay.” The owner replied that they’re just rocks and that’s when they were named Murphy’s Haystacks.

“The farmer must have harrowed his land to produce such an impressive abundance of hay!” “Nope, they’re just rocks.”

These giant boulders are what geologists refer to as inselberg, which is formed when a body of hard rock surrounded by a layer of soft rock become exposed to erosion. If you look closely at the rocks, you can discern the different layers.

Murphy’s Haystacks are what geologists refer to as inselberg.

The creation of Murphy’s Haystacks began about 1.5 billion years ago when boiling magma filled the gaps below the 7 to 10 kilometers earth’s surface and then cooled. This created a granite base. Later on, some 100,000 years ago, the whole area where the haystacks lie were buried by calcareous dune sand. It was only 34,000 years ago when they were uncovered by severe erosion, thus exposing their present form as pillars and boulders.

The tallest of the boulders are about 8 meters highs!

Unlike the Stonehenge, however, these rocks serve no known astronomical purpose. But due to their strikingly surreal appearance and their bright red glow, they have become quite the tourist attraction on the Eyre Peninsula. Murphy’s haystacks are located on a private property owned by Dennis Cash, grandson of the eponymous Denis Murphy.

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Travel

China’s Fenghuang Ancient City: A Glimpse into Pre-Modernization China

Take a peek into what a typical Chinese village looked like more than 300 years ago!

Mich Escultura

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Between the untouched beauty of nature and the sleek appeal of the modern world lies the mystic beauty of the ancient world. And if you've ever wanted to marvel at the beauty of an old town that hasn't been touched by modernization, China's city of Fenghuang is the place to check out.

Located southwest of Hunan Province lies Fenghuang (Phoenix) Ancient Town, which was built way back in the Qing Dynasty. Surrounded by mountains and with a river passing through it, Fenghuang has been called "the most beautiful town in China."

Fenhuang is located in a remote mountain area. But it's not just its location that makes it breathtaking. Just take a look at this surreal town that has kept its appearance intact for more than 300 years!

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Art

Mysterious Sayhuite Stone Depicts More than 200 Ancient Geometric and Zoomorphic Figures

This huge rock contains answers about the daily lives of the Inca people.

Mich Escultura

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47 kilometers east of Abancay and 3 hours from the city of Cusco lies the mysterious Sayhuite Stone that contains over 200 geometric and zoomorphic figures like reptiles, frogs, and even cats!

An artist's rendering of the figures found in the Sayhuite Stone.

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Found at the top of Concacha hill, the giant two-by-four meter rock contains tiny terraces, pond, rivers, tunnels, and irrigation channels. The monolit is also surrounded by large rocks the size of cars that have been shaped as well. While there have been some speculations on the purpose of the Sayhuite Stone, these surrounding rocks still remain a mystery.

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Art

These 7 Wonders of the World Will Soon Be Underwater

Nothing says, “Go and travel right now!” like the fact that your favorite world wonder might be underwater someday.

Mich Escultura

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Climate change is real, people! Ice sheets in Greenland, Antarctica, and the Arctic are melting, which means sea levels will rise all over the world. Not only will it threaten coastal communities and ecosystems, but it could also mean that some of our heritage sites may soon require a SCUBA license to see.

According to a 2014 paper in the journal Environmental Research Letters, more than a fifth of UNESCO's 720 World Heritage sites are at risk of flooding or complete submersion by 2100!

If global temperatures reach the 3.6-degree Fahrenheit warming limit set out by the Paris Agreement, these heritage sites will soon become partly or completely submerged below local sea level.

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