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20 Before And After Photos That Show How The World Has Changed A Lot

The world has definitely changed over the years and these 20 photos proved the difference.

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It’s no secret that the world is definitely not like it used to be. The present time has obviously changed from the beginning of recorded history, but the difference is usually left unnoticed until it was clearly pointed out.

The website re-photos took the popular “before and after photos” to a whole new level. The site encourages photographers to recreate historical pictures, and the images reminded everyone how much the world has changed.

The Signing of the Declaration of Independence in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 1776

Source: re-photos
The Signing of the Declaration of Independence in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 2017

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Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington, D.C., facing the United States Capitol building 1900

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Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington, D.C., facing the United States Capitol building 2013

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The Moulin Rouge nightclub in Paris, France 1900

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The Moulin Rouge nightclub in Paris, France 2016

Source: re-photos
Hammerfest, a small fishing community in Norway 1889

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Hammerfest, a small fishing community in Norway 2004

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The Eiffel Tower in Paris, France 1900

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The Eiffel Tower in Paris, France 2017

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The Chaney Glacier in Montana, United States 1911

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The Chaney Glacier in Montana, United States 2005

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#10. St. Martin Street in Poznań, Poland 1945

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St. Martin Street in Poznań, Poland 2017

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Frauenkirche Dresden in Germany 1897

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Frauenkirche Dresden in Germany 2010

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Esplanade des Invalides in Paris, France 1900

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Esplanade des Invalides in Paris, France 2017

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Osnabrück Central Station in Germany 1965

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Osnabrück Central Station in Germany 2015

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Most of the before and after photos were taken over a hundred years apart, which is why the difference is quite understandable. However, even photos that were shot just a couple of years apart still managed to show a considerable change in these historical places.

Nowomiejska Street in Lodz, Poland 1874

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Nowomiejska Street in Lodz, Poland 2016

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Palais Im Groben Garten in Dresden, Germany 1900

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Palais Im Groben Garten in Dresden, Germany 2005

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Sydney Harbour, Australia 1965

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Sydney Harbour, Australia 2016

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The Queen’s Hotel in Kandy, Sri Lanka 1915

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The Queen’s Hotel in Kandy, Sri Lanka 2018

Source: re-photos
A shipwreck in Lanzarote, located in the Canary Islands, Spain 1994

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A shipwreck in Lanzarote, located in the Canary Islands, Spain 2018

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View from St James Bridge near Newcastle Upon Tyne, Scotland 1975

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View from St James Bridge near Newcastle Upon Tyne, Scotland 2013

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Calle La Merced-Puente Bolognesi, Peru 1916

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Calle La Merced-Puente Bolognesi, Peru 2016

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The Bay Bridge near San Francisco, California 1980

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The Bay Bridge near San Francisco, California 2007

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A fishing village in Andenes, Norway 1898

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A fishing village in Andenes, Norway 1992

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A street in Osnabruck, Germany 1953

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A street in Osnabruck, Germany 2015

Source: re-photos

Although changes in these historical places were mostly a result of the modern era, some of them were caused by the aftermath of World War II and were completely rebuilt to preserve history.

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History

World’s Largest Freshwater Pearl Formerly Owned by Catherine the Great Sold At $374,000

The Sleeping Lion was one of the famed empress’ prized jewels.

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A freshwater pearl once owned by Catherine the Great was sold for an astounding $374,000 on May 31, 2018. The auction was done by the Amsterdam Pearl Society and was held at The Hague.

Considered as the world's largest pearl, the "Sleeping Lion" (noting its unusual shape) weighs 5.4 ounces and is 2.75 inches in length. According to the Venduehuis auction house catalogue, it was sold below its estimated value, which was was between $397,000 and $630,000.

The unusual shape is responsible for the pearl's name.

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History

Why Is Iceland Green and Why Is Greenland Icy?

This is why I have trust issues…

Mark Andrew

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Countries have interesting origin stories about how they get their names. Generally speaking, country names are either based on the land’s features, a tribe, a person, or even a directional description.

Bahrain, for example, literally means “Two Seas” while United States of America was named after Italian explorer Amerigo Vespucci. On the other hand, Norway, as its name implies, means “The Way North” or “The Northern Way” while Mauritania is based on the Mauris, the country’s largest ethnic group.

It’s when we reach Greenland and Iceland that things get really interesting - and a bit confusing!

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History

Why Sin Eating Was Once The Worst Job In The World

Technically, it was a thankless job.

Vincent Alocada

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If you think you are unfortunate for having to hold on to a job that you think sucks, bear in mind that at one point in history, there were people who went the extent of risking their salvation just for money. For the so-called Sin Eaters then, it did not matter if they had to suffer eternal damnation in hell for as long they could eat and have some coins in their pockets.

While a Sin Eater is already a thing of the past, there is no questioning that it held the notion as being the worst job in England, Scotland, and Wales where it was practiced from the Middle Ages until the early 1900s. You see, a Sin Eater had to eat a piece of bread placed on the chest of a dying person, otherwise known as a sin-soaked bread, while the family of the would-be departing person watched, prayed, and drank a flagon of ale.

By eating the sin-soaked bread, it was believed then that a Sin Eater could absolve the dying person from his sins, and his chances of entering heaven would improve.

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