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History

5 Vintage Illustrations of the Future That Have Become a Reality

The future is now.

Humans have never been content of just living in the present. We have this incessant need to know what will happen in the future. Why do you think Nostradamus got really famous?

Predictions about the future come in different forms, just like this vintage cartoon illustrations here. These predictions go waaay back, as old as the 1800s or early 1900s. Back then, these illustrations may have looked silly to downright ridiculous, but looking at them right now, they are totally on point!

#1. TV glasses

This picture appeared in an issue of Life Magazine in 1963. It shows science fiction author Hugo Gernsback wearing an apparatus which he named “TV glasses.” He predicted that one day, people can watch TV at a really close range and actually interact with the screen.

#2. Robotic vacuum cleaners

This image is called “electric scrubbing” and was created by Jean-Marc Côté, and his team of illustrators in 1910. It was part of a series of pictures named “En L’An 2000” (in the year 2000).

#3. Digital classroom

It is called “The Rise of the Computerized School” and was made by Shigeru Komatsuzaki for a Japanese magazine called Computopia in 1969. It shows the author’s vision of how a classroom will look like in the future. The teacher is just an image on the screen and the students each have a computer to use. There are also robots that punish disobedient students.

#4. Video calls

Made in 1930, this illustration shows two ladies hanging out what looks like an outdoor cafe and each has a screen that shows a person whom they seem to be talking with. Hello, smartphones and video chat?

#5. Self-driving cars

This made the cover of Popular Science magazine in June 1940. They predicted a future in which cars can function without a need for drivers. We may not have this fully right now, but auto companies are already working hard to make this a reality.

History

World’s Largest Freshwater Pearl Formerly Owned by Catherine the Great Sold At $374,000

The Sleeping Lion was one of the famed empress’ prized jewels.

A freshwater pearl once owned by Catherine the Great was sold for an astounding $374,000 on May 31, 2018. The auction was done by the Amsterdam Pearl Society and was held at The Hague.

Considered as the world's largest pearl, the "Sleeping Lion" (noting its unusual shape) weighs 5.4 ounces and is 2.75 inches in length. According to the Venduehuis auction house catalogue, it was sold below its estimated value, which was was between $397,000 and $630,000.

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History

Why Is Iceland Green and Why Is Greenland Icy?

This is why I have trust issues…

Countries have interesting origin stories about how they get their names. Generally speaking, country names are either based on the land’s features, a tribe, a person, or even a directional description.

Bahrain, for example, literally means “Two Seas” while United States of America was named after Italian explorer Amerigo Vespucci. On the other hand, Norway, as its name implies, means “The Way North” or “The Northern Way” while Mauritania is based on the Mauris, the country’s largest ethnic group.

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History

Why Sin Eating Was Once The Worst Job In The World

Technically, it was a thankless job.

If you think you are unfortunate for having to hold on to a job that you think sucks, bear in mind that at one point in history, there were people who went the extent of risking their salvation just for money. For the so-called Sin Eaters then, it did not matter if they had to suffer eternal damnation in hell for as long they could eat and have some coins in their pockets.

While a Sin Eater is already a thing of the past, there is no questioning that it held the notion as being the worst job in England, Scotland, and Wales where it was practiced from the Middle Ages until the early 1900s. You see, a Sin Eater had to eat a piece of bread placed on the chest of a dying person, otherwise known as a sin-soaked bread, while the family of the would-be departing person watched, prayed, and drank a flagon of ale.

By eating the sin-soaked bread, it was believed then that a Sin Eater could absolve the dying person from his sins, and his chances of entering heaven would improve.

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