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This 3,000-Year-Old Plant Thrives in One of the Harshest Conditions in the World

We all know how many trees can live up to hundreds of years, but here’s one living plant that’s 3,000 years old!

Mich Escultura

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In the middle of the harsh sandy plains of South America are plants that are so green and luscious that they look surreal amid their surroundings. And while these surreal green structures may look like moss-covered rocks, they’re actually plants!

That's not a moss-covered rock in the middle of the desert; that's a Yareta plant!

That's not a moss-covered rock in the middle of the desert; that's a Yareta plant!

The Yareta is a flowing plant that has lived for three thousand years. They're known as llareta in Spanish, and their scientific name is Azorella Compacta.

The Yareta is a flowing plant that has lived for three thousand years. They're known as llareta in Spanish, and their scientific name is Azorella Compacta.

These plants are found in the Puna grasslands of Andes, Peru, Bolivia, Northern Chile. They may also be found in western Argentina at altitudes of 3,200 to 4,500 meters! Just imagine these lush green Yareta plants living in conditions where the wind and cold can crack granite!

If you want to see a Yareta plant for yourself, you'll have to travel to the dry, cold Andes in Northern Chile to find them!

If you want to see a Yareta plant for yourself, you'll have to travel to the dry, cold Andes in Northern Chile to find them!

So how can these Yareta plants survive in those cold and windy conditions for thousands of years? Their stems are so strong that they can effortlessly carry a full-grown adult human. And on top of that, they also grow in dense packs and stay close to the ground to avoid losing heat. That’s how they avoid getting uprooted by strong winds that blow in their natural habitat. And to protect their foliage from drying out, the Yareta plants’ leaves are covered in wax!

Up close, the leaves of the Yareta plant look like little succulents.

The leaves of the Yareta plant look like little succulents when looked at up close.

Source: Lon&Queta

Growing in dense packs close to the ground with wax-covered leaves – that’s the secret to the long life of Yareta plants.

Yareta plants were once harvested for fuel, but since they grow so slowly (15mm a year to be exact), they’re considered a non-sustainable source of fuel.

So today, they’re mostly left alone to grow for years and years!

Yareta plants may have once been a source of fuel but since they grow so slowly, they're considered an unsustainable source.

Yareta plants may have once been a source of fuel, but since they grow so slowly, they're considered an unsustainable source.

Source: Lon&Queta

Sci/Tech

This Self-Flying Camera Drone Will Follow You Around, Ready To Take Your Aerial Selfies.

We can’t get our eyes off this self-flying, portable and user-friendly camera drone.

Jessa Ventures

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The newest drone in the market is out and it happens to be a self-piloting camera. Yes, this is not a drill nor your favorite sci-fi film. Zero Zero Robotics has recently launched the Hover Camera Passport which is now up for grabs at $599, from a limited time offer of $549.

This futuristic flying camera is a portable, lightweight and paperback-sized drone. It weighs just 242 grams, hence, it doesn't need an FAA approval 'requiring owners to register their vehicles weighing 250 grams and more.'

Dubbed as "The Camera of the Future," this product is a true eye candy for 'tech geeks and thrillseekers'. It has a sleek design that doesn't disappoint and features that are definitely worth a second look.

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Curiously Peculiar Ice Cave Freezes During Summer and Melts During Winter

What an icehole!

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One of Mother Nature's most intriguing mysteries can be found somewhere east of Coudersport in Pennsylvania. There lies an eight-by-ten feet hole that opens into a curiously peculiar abyss, about forty feet deep, that freezes during warmer months and melts during winter.

Take a look at the Coudersport Ice Mine. It is not like any other ice caves that remain frozen during winter and warm up during summer. Ice begins to form in spring and continues to increase in volume as temperatures rise. Meanwhile, ice in the mine thaws as heat dissipates and winter sets in, which is just about the time when ice caves are expected to freeze.

Quite a paradox, isn't it?

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Sci/Tech

Has Science Finally Found Proof that God Exists?

Science and religion have been at odds since time immemorial, but will this recent discovery finally reconcile the two sides?

Mich Escultura

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People are often discouraged from discussing religion and the existence of a god when they're surrounded by scientists. Many scientists deny the existence of a god, particularly in the religious sense. Some scientists tend to lean more towards agnosticism, wherein they're open to believing in God if evidence presents itself. Others are more adamant atheists that deny the existence of a supreme being.

The concept of God is such a polarizing issue today, since more and more people are veering further away religion and turning to science for answers. This comes as no surprise since scientific advancements are now explaining phenomena that were once attributed to a divine being.

However, what if there truly is a God? And what if the proof of God's existence is now so profound that scientists can no longer ignore it? What if, after years and years of people arguing over the existence or non-existence of god, the proof is finally here, clear as day?

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