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This 3,000-Year-Old Plant Thrives in One of the Harshest Conditions in the World

We all know how many trees can live up to hundreds of years, but here’s one living plant that’s 3,000 years old!

In the middle of the harsh sandy plains of South America are plants that are so green and luscious that they look surreal amid their surroundings. And while these surreal green structures may look like moss-covered rocks, they’re actually plants!

That's not a moss-covered rock in the middle of the desert; that's a Yareta plant!

That's not a moss-covered rock in the middle of the desert; that's a Yareta plant!

The Yareta is a flowing plant that has lived for three thousand years. They're known as llareta in Spanish, and their scientific name is Azorella Compacta.

The Yareta is a flowing plant that has lived for three thousand years. They're known as llareta in Spanish, and their scientific name is Azorella Compacta.

These plants are found in the Puna grasslands of Andes, Peru, Bolivia, Northern Chile. They may also be found in western Argentina at altitudes of 3,200 to 4,500 meters! Just imagine these lush green Yareta plants living in conditions where the wind and cold can crack granite!

If you want to see a Yareta plant for yourself, you'll have to travel to the dry, cold Andes in Northern Chile to find them!

If you want to see a Yareta plant for yourself, you'll have to travel to the dry, cold Andes in Northern Chile to find them!

So how can these Yareta plants survive in those cold and windy conditions for thousands of years? Their stems are so strong that they can effortlessly carry a full-grown adult human. And on top of that, they also grow in dense packs and stay close to the ground to avoid losing heat. That’s how they avoid getting uprooted by strong winds that blow in their natural habitat. And to protect their foliage from drying out, the Yareta plants’ leaves are covered in wax!

Up close, the leaves of the Yareta plant look like little succulents.

The leaves of the Yareta plant look like little succulents when looked at up close.

Source: Lon&Queta

Growing in dense packs close to the ground with wax-covered leaves – that’s the secret to the long life of Yareta plants.

Yareta plants were once harvested for fuel, but since they grow so slowly (15mm a year to be exact), they’re considered a non-sustainable source of fuel.

So today, they’re mostly left alone to grow for years and years!

Yareta plants may have once been a source of fuel but since they grow so slowly, they're considered an unsustainable source.

Yareta plants may have once been a source of fuel, but since they grow so slowly, they're considered an unsustainable source.

Source: Lon&Queta

Sci/Tech

New 7 Deadly Sins Of The Digital World – And You Might Be Guilty Of Them

What are you guilty of?

Pride, lust, gluttony, greed, sloth, envy, and wrath are more known as the seven deadly sins. These are classifications of vices in Christian teaching. While these have been around since the 3rd century AD, a new representation has now come forth.

A Twitter user tweeted an updated version of the seven deadly sins. It's so up to date that you might even be guilty of a few.

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Sci/Tech

Rare-Earth Mineral Deposit That Could Meet Global Demands For Centuries Found In Japan

Japan could soon dominate the global supply of rare-earth minerals.

Researchers in Japan have discovered deposits of rare-earth minerals capable of supplying the world on a “semi-infinite basis.” The new study, published in Nature, stated that the deposit is abundant in valuable metals.

The study authors wrote that there are 16 million tons of these metals. There’s enough amount of yttrium to sustain the global demand for almost 800 years. There are also enough amounts of dysprosium, europium and terbium to meet the demand for hundreds and hundreds of years.

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Sci/Tech

10 Scientific Theories that Could Hint at the Possible Existence of God

Can science prove the existence of God? Well check out these scientific explanations!

Science and religion don’t always together. Nonetheless, a number of intrepid scientists have made it their mission to prove the existence of God (with a capital G) with science. Some of these theories have their own holes and critics, but believers may find it attractive to learn that science may be starting to align with their beliefs.

Physicist Kurt Godel created a mathematical equation based on Saint Anselm’s ontological argument for the existence of God. The argument is based on the premise that God is the greatest being in the universe. If God does not exist, he (or she, or it, whatever floats your boat) does not exist. And a greater being—one that exists—is possible to imagine. But since it’s not possible to imagine a being greater than the greatest being in the universe, then God must necessarily exist.

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