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Indonesian Safari Park Allegedly Drugged Its Lion for Photo Sessions with Tourists

The NGO posted the video on its Facebook page to raise awareness about animal treatment. It has also called on the Indonesian Natural Resources Conservation Agency to investigate the issue.

Ann Nuñez

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An Indonesian Safari Park is taking a lot heat from netizens after  a video showing an allegedly drugged lion during a tourists’ photo session surfaced online.

In a video uploaded by Non-governmental organization Scorpion Wildlife Trade Monitoring Group, a woman and a young boy were seen sitting beside a lion cub, presumably for a photo session at Taman Safari, a safari park in Bogor, West Java. The lion cub was obviously drowsy and could neither keep its eyes open nor hold its head up. A park attendant was seen holding the lion’s head upright when it could no longer do it on its own.

The NGO posted the video on its Facebook page to raise awareness about animal treatment. It has also called on the Indonesian Natural Resources Conservation Agency to investigate the issue.


However, Taman Safari has already given its official statement, denying any mistreatment of their animals. According to their statement, the park “has been a champion for wildlife conservation in Indonesia for the last thirty years,” and with its known reputation, would not risk tarnishing their name with an issue such as sedating lions for tourist interactions.

Watch the video below and see for yourself if the lion looked like it was indeed sedated:

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What do you think? Was the lion really drugged or was it just a case of bad timing and the lion was only really too sleepy? Share your thoughts in the comments section.

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Terrifying Moment Two Wildlife Officers Bravely Rescue A Trapped Cougar

These officers had nothing but catchpoles, yet they still helped the ferocious creature.

Ann Moises

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Wildlife conservation officers risk their lives every day to help even the most dangerous animals. It’s a heroic and noble career, and these men and women courageously fulfill their responsibilities with great pride.

When Division of Wildlife Resources employee Mark Ekins and his colleague learned that a cougar was caught in a bobcat trap in the Pine Valley Mountains in southern Utah, they did not hesitate in rescuing the large cat.

Carrying nothing but catchpoles, they bravely freed the mountain lion in the suspenseful six-minute footage below.

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Groundbreaking Research Claims Pig Organs ‘Could Be Transplanted Into Humans’ Soon

I’m really not sure how I feel about this…

Mark Andrew

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Recent developments in medical science point to the possibility of pig organs being used for humans to address the crisis in organ donation.

The groundbreaking discovery caught the attention of everyone after a pig heart has been successfully grafted into a baboon. The animal survived for two years, the researchers said.

This report makes an exciting milestone since presently, primates receiving organ transplants have only survived for a maximum of six months.

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Man Opens A Rattlesnake’s Rattle To See What’s Inside

The rattling sound serves as a warning signal; but what’s inside this infamous rattle anyway?

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Rattlesnakes are notorious for being among the deadliest reptiles in the world. Found mostly in North and South Americas, this species of snake is definitely one of the most venomous snakes in the world, with the Eastern Diamondback as the most venomous of the species.

Most people who live in areas where they are endemic cannot miss out a rattlesnake’s distinct sound – which is that of a shaken rattle, obviously. This buzzing, rattling sound is actually a warning sign for its predators. Hissing is also part of its warning signal secondary to the rattling sound.

According to Wisconsin-based herpetologist, Sara Viernum, who told LiveScience, the rattles are actually “segments of keratin that fit loosely inside one another at the end of the snake’s tail.”

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