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10 Really Ancient Bridges That Are Still Being Used Up to This Day

Thousand-year-old bridges that are still intact may be few, but they hold a lot of history and tell a great story.

Ancient structures such as The Colosseum, the Leaning Tower of Pisa, and even the Pyramids of Giza are more than just tourist destinations – they are living proof of the colorful history that we have. But what about ancient structures that have been built hundreds of years ago that aren’t exactly places where tourists would flock to see but are still being used today?

Early bridges aren’t exactly tourist destinations, yet they happen to maintain their original use. Built to last, these structures have stood the test of time and the wear and tear that accompanies it, and have helped build communities and save lives as it survived hundreds of years.

Let us look at a few examples:

10. Pons Fabricius

10. Pons Fabricius

Source: cerelith

Built by Lucius Fabricius in 62 BC, the Pons Fabricius is one of best Roman structures that will show you the unmatched building techniques of the Romans even after thousands of years.

9. Ponte Vecchio

9. Ponte Vecchio

Source: lupo3372

Found in Florence, Italy, the Ponte Vecchio bridge was built in 1345. It was constructed to replace an old, wooden bridge that didn’t stand floods. Ponte Vecchio contained an arcade of shops that is still used up to this day.

8. Ponte di Rialto

8. Ponte di Rialto

Built in 191, the Ponte di Rialto was constructed to replace an old wooden one by Antonio da Ponte. He had stiff competition in master artists Michelangelo and Palladio. The bridge was both praised and criticized because people felt it was “top-heavy and ungraceful” just like the Eiffel Tower.

7. Khaju Bridge

7. Khaju Bridge

Source: al.thani_1

Shah Abbas II had the Khaju Bridge constructed on top of one another. It was used to act as a dam and allowed people to cross the Zayandeh River. However, the main use of this bridge was for socials. To this day, the Khaju has quite an impressive array of magnificent paintings and tiles and a pavilion was built in the middle to appreciate the scenery. Now, the pavilion is used as a tea house and art gallery.

6. Shaharah Bridge

6. Shaharah Bridge

Source: Gavin

The Shaharah Bridge is found in the country of Yemen and is also called the “Bridge of Sighs.” It was built in the 17th century for the main purpose of connecting the mountains of Jabal al Emir and Jabal al Faish. Shaharah Bridge spans a 650-feet canyon.

5. Cendere Bridge

5. Cendere Bridge

Source: epack629

Also known as the Severan Bridge, the Cendere Bridge was built in the second century by four Kommagenean cities in Turkey with the objective to honor the Roman emperor Septimus Severus and his family. It holds the title as the second longest arched bridge that was built by the Romans.

4. Anji Bridge

4. Anji Bridge

Source: Bob

Built in 605 AD, the Anji Bridge or the Zhaozhao Bridge is the oldest one in China. The name of the bridge is translated as “Safe Crossing Bridge.” When it was constructed, it was considered as technically advanced as it had the largest arc. The Anji Bridge has received numerous recognitions from different award giving bodies.

3. Ponte Sant’Angelo

3. Ponte Sant’Angelo

Source: Jimmy Harris

Also known as the Bridge of the Holy Angel, Ponte Sant’Angelo was built in 136 AD by Emperor Hadrian. It is one of the most famous bridges in Rome because of its beauty.

2. Tarr Steps

2. Tarr Steps

It is hard to tell when the Tarr Steps was built, but there are guesses that it could have been between 3000 BC to the medieval times. The Tarr Steps is an example of a clapper bridge, a type of bridge that is made out of rocks that rest atop each other. There is an urban legend that this bridge was built by the devil.

1. Arkadiko Bridge

1. Arkadiko Bridge

Source: Pal Meir

Located in Greece, the Arkadiko bridge is the oldest surviving arch bridge that is still being used to this day. The bridge is said to have been built in the Greek Bronze Age and is made purely of limestone boulders with no bonding agent. Arkadiko Bridge was part of a military road system back then.

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This Bridge In Japan Will Make You Feel Like You’re Riding A Roller Coaster

The Eshima Ohashi bridge is the world’s third largest bridge of its kind.

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